The importance of writing good dialogue in your screenplay

You must write good dialogue if you want to make the characters you have created look real. 
Human beings are naturally endowed with a voice; a voice that allows them to make a speech; a speech that allows them to speak a language; and a language that lets them communicate with one another.
A character in a screenplay is a replica of a real human. It must do just like the human.

You need good dialogue if you want a drive for your story. Good dialogue is the voice of a story. It says what a story is. It gives the story its existence, timing, location and action. It is the name of the story.

You must write good dialogue if you want the hearts and minds of your audience to be drained into the soul of your story.
Good dialogue is the means by which a screenplay or a movie speaks to the ears and minds of the audience. It is the link between the audience and the screenplay.

You must write good dialogue if you want your screenplay to be in the lips of everyone.
After watching the movie from your screenplay, the good dialogues therein would be what the audience would always imitate in their daily life activities. They would wish they were really those characters they saw in that movie. They would always remember the movie. You, the writer of the screenplay will always be their friend.

You need good dialogue if you want to be convinced and satisfied you have really created a world.
Writing a screenplay is like creating a world. A world wouldn't be perfect if there was no communication. Communication is the life of a creation. Once you find out that the world you have created has a good communication flow, your mind will be at rest. You will be so happy with yourself. You will be so proud to say ''I'm the writer of this movie''

A good dialogue is the heartbeat of a screenplay. It makes your screenplay sound.

Written by: Winston 'Winny Greazy' Oge

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