Great dialogue: An approach to a great dialogue in your script

Close your eyes and think about what it means for a character you have created to be a replica of a real human.
Unless a character is to be deaf and dumb in the screenplay, you should understand that the power it has to express itself is through its ability to speak.

The character doesn't only speak to itself. It speaks to its fellow characters.
It tells who and what it is through its speech.
It expresses its life by speaking out to its fellows.

Think about what your story would look like if your characters do not have anything to say about it.

The speeches made by the characters create a way for a screenplay to arrive at its theme.

Their speech is the skeleton of the screenplay.
Apart from seeing the locations, the time, the actions and the motions on the screen, the audience hears them from the characters. The characters' speeches do give a better description.

You have to understand you are the one to direct these speeches by your characters to their appropriate recipients.

You have to again understand that your screenplay comes alive when the dialogue is driven by the natural internal motive of your characters.

Dialogue is not written to complete a part of a scene or a part of a screenplay. It is an integral of a screenplay. Whenever a moment in the screenplay needs it, it shows up.

Dialogue is not aimed at painting a screenplay. It is aimed at cementing the communication gap between moments in the screenplay; and between the screenplay and the audience.

What of the real dialogues that ensued in the life story that inspired you to write a screenplay? Did you throw them away?
Writing a screenplay is like creating a natural world, and the dialogues therein should be natural and original.

Be focused. Just be focused. Great dialogues shape a screenplay.

Written by: Winston 'Winny Greazy' Oge


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